Martin Garden Center Press Release


PRESS RELEASE

4.18.17

MARTIN GARDEN CENTER HOSTS SOUTH CAROLINA 811 TREE GIVEAWAY ON APRIL 24 from 3-5 PM.
Martin Garden Center will be hosting the Greenville event as South Carolina 811 celebrates the tenth anniversary of National Safe Digging Month by giving away trees across the state.
 
QUICK PITCH

The first 25 people who stop by the South Carolina 811 table and request for their utilities to be marked will receive a free tree up to a $50 value.


FULL RELEASE

GREENVILLE, SC, April 18, 2017 — Martin Garden Center announces today that it will be the Greenville host for the South Carolina 811 Tree Giveaway Day on April 24th from 3-5 pm.  

South Carolina 811 celebrates the tenth anniversary of “National Safe Digging Month” by giving away trees across the state during the month of April at four different cities in South Carolina.  Martin Garden Center is hosting the Greenville event.

The first 25 people who stop by the South Carolina 811 table and request for their utilities to be marked will receive a free tree up to a $50 value.

Note:  South Carolina 811 encourages interested persons to create their portal account in advance to speed up the sign-up process on the day of the event.  Any time before the event they may click here to visit the portal and click “Sign Up” to create an account.  Be sure to confirm your account be clicking on the email confirmation link.  Once your locate is requested at the South Carolina 811 table, you will be given a voucher to be used at that time for a free tree up to a $50 value.

“April is not only National Safe Digging Month, but also the home of Arbor Day and Earth Day. We are giving away trees promote a healthy environment and to strongly encourage individuals to call 811 before they begin digging to plant trees for those holidays,” said Misty Wise, Executive Director of South Carolina 811. “By calling 811 to have the underground utility lines in their area marked, homeowners are making an important decision that can help keep them and their communities safe and connected.”

“We are very excited to be a part of this worthwhile event,” says Reggie Meehan, owner and Chief Inspiration Officer (CIO) of Martin Garden Center.  “We support the ‘Call Before You Dig’ program in every way and we realize the seriousness of striking utility lines when planting trees.  Plus this is a great occasion to create community awareness on this issue.  We were happy to get involved!”

The South Carolina 811 organization states that “Striking a single line can cause injury, repair costs, fines and inconvenient outages. Every digging project, no matter how large or small, warrants a call to 811. Installing a mailbox, building a deck and planting a tree or garden are all examples of digging projects that should only begin a few days after a call to 811.”

Martin Garden Center, located on Martin Road in Greenville, has the largest selection of flowering plants in the upstate and prides itself on offering quality indoor and outdoor plants and garden accessories, along with the best customer service possible. With acres of flowers, shrubs, trees and herbs, Martin Garden Center has everything needed to create a garden masterpiece.

South Carolina 811 is a not-for-profit organization,
established in 1978, to be the innovative communication resource for damage prevention of underground infrastructure, dedicated to the education, success, and safety of stakeholders and the public in South Carolina.

South Carolina 811 and Martin Garden Center encourage area residents to visit www.sc811.com/safe-dig-month for more information or about the tree program  (Free Tree News Release) or visit www.sc811.com for more information about digging safely in South Carolina.

For more information, please contact Martin Garden Center at 864-277-1818.  Martin Garden Center encourages area residents to visit their Facebook Event Page for more information as well.


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Behind the Counter – 2017 Issue

Community Journals, LLC,  Photo Credit: Carol Boone Stewart

Martin Garden Center Press Release

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PRESS RELEASE

7.05.16

MARTIN GARDEN CENTER AND UNITED COMMUNITY BANK ANNOUNCE TOMATO CHARITY GIVEAWAY
Martin Garden Center and United Community Bank join forces to donate tomato plants to local community gardens
 
QUICK PITCH
Forty-two flats of heirloom tomatoes go to good causes
 
FULL RELEASE

Project_Host_Sally_Green_smGREENVILLE,  July 5, 2016 — Martin Garden Center announced today a joint effort with United Community Bank in Mauldin, SC to donate forty-two flats of heirloom tomatoes to charities and local community gardens.  Some of the beneficiaries are Project Host, Gardening for Good, Meals on Wheels, Roper Mountain Science Center Special Events, the Greater Greenville Master Gardener Heritage Garden at Roper Mountain Science Center, the Renew Community Garden, and others.

Sally Green, executive director for Project Host, which now runs the Gardening for Good project, picked up the flats for the Project Host Garden and was very enthusiastic about local community garden efforts. “There is a need in Greenville to join together and establish a working conversation between the various community gardens.  We are super excited at this prospect and thank Martin Garden Center and United Community Bank for this show of support for local community gardens.”

Reggie Meehan, owner and Chief Inspiration Officer (CIO) of Martin Garden Center was more than happy to donate the tomato flats.  “A miscommunication during a busy season resulted in 1000 tomatoes needing a new home. I feel it’s always nice to give back to the community that has done so much for Martin Garden Center.”

United Community Bank, with locations throughout Georgia, North Carolina, Tennessee, and South Carolina, offers personal banking, business banking, corporate and commercial banking, and advisory services.  They were happy to work with Martin Garden Center in donating the surplus tomatoes for charity purposes and participate in this endeavor.

Project Host was the first soup kitchen in the country to have a garden on site. And this is one garden that earns its keep.  It has grown tons of produce for the hungry, and their culinary students always have access to the freshest produce to use when honing their skills.  Started in 1998 by Carol McLaurin and Kris Burton – two Master Gardeners who decided their passion for gardening could help people in their community – the Garden has become an integral part of Project Host’s success.

Martin Garden Center, located on Martin Road in Greenville, has the largest selection of flowering plants in the upstate and prides itself on offering quality indoor and outdoor plants and garden accessories, along with the best customer service possible. With acres of flowers, shrubs, trees and herbs, Martin Garden Center has everything needed to create a garden masterpiece.

Martin Garden Center states that there are still additional flats available for pickup, so any charity or community garden may come by at their convenience to pick up tomatoes.  Some community gardens are doing a second planting, so now is the perfect time for picking up additional tomato plants.  They are available on a first-come, first-serve basis to charity or community gardens in the area.

For more information, please contact Martin Garden Center at 864-277-1818.


COMPANY INFORMATION

MGC_Press_ImageMartin Garden Center, located on Martin Road in Greenville, has the largest selection of flowering plants in the upstate and prides itself on offering quality indoor and outdoor plants and garden accessories, along with the best customer service possible. With acres of flowers, shrubs, trees and herbs, Martin Garden Center has everything needed to create a garden masterpiece.

“People tell me Martin’s is their happy place, a place they go when they have the blues. I’m proud to provide a refuge and make their days happier.” – Reggie Meehan, CIO (Chief Inspirational Officer).

We are happy to provide high-res images for publications.


CONTACT INFORMATION

Martin Garden Center
198 Martin Road
Greenville, SC
864-277-1818
www.martinnursery.com

Martin Garden Center Summer Hours
          Monday – Friday:  9am – 6pmSaturday:  9am – 5pm

Press Contact & Interview Requests
Reggie Meehan
864-277-1818
Products:
Annuals
Perennials
Herbs
Shrubs and Trees
Container Gardens, Living Centerpieces and Living Bouquets
Houseplants and Tropicals
Soil, Fertilizer and Chemicals
Pots, Plant Accessories and Gardeners Tools
Gifts and Gift Cards

USEFUL LINKS:

Martin Garden Center Website:  https://www.martinnursery.com
Martin Garden Center on Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/martinnurseryMartin Garden Center on Google+: http://plus.google.com/+MartinGardenCenterGreenville/about
Martin Garden Center on Instagram:  http://www.instagram.com/martingardencenter/
Martin Garden Center on Pinterest: http://www.pinterest.com/martingardenctr/

Behind the Counter – 2016 Issue

Community Journals, LLC,  Photo Credit: Carol Boone Stewart

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Why Plant in the Fall?

There is something about autumn that brings out the gardener in all of us.  Maybe that is the nature of living in the South, where the pervasive heat of summer drives us indoors and we only venture out again when there is a morning chill in the air and dew drops again glisten on the lawn.  Then, we perview the damage done by the brutal summer heat, and we begin repairing our garden oasis.

People often ask, when is the best time to plant.  For trees and shrubs, fall is the right answer because it allows time for the root system to become established before all the demands are placed upon your new tree or shrub in the spring.  Just imagine if you were a shrub and you were placed in the akward position of having to acclimate to a new environment, grow big and tall, and flower all at the same time.  That’s a lot of demands on your new shrub, but that’s what happens when you plant in the spring.  Now, imagine what happens when you plant in the summer … during a heat wave … and a drought.  Ouch!

The root system of your shrub or tree is the part that takes in the nutrients and the water.  By allowing your tree or shrub to root in during the fall and winter, your established root system will be able to absorb more nutrients and water in the spring, thus promoting more growth and more blooms during the spring growing season.  And, in the summer, the more established the root system, the better your tree or shrub will be able to withstand drought conditions.

Let’s debunk the myth … or misunderstanding … that people have about waiting to plant until AFTER the final frost date, which is April 16th here in the Greenville area.  The final frost date is for gaging when to plant annuals, not trees and shrubs.  Clemson Extension states in its Planting Shrubs Correctly HGIC 1052 flyer the following:

  •  “Unlike the tops of ornamental plants that go dormant and cease growth for the winter, roots of ornamental plants in the Southeast continue to grow throughout the winter months.”
  •  “Fall planting allows the carbohydrates produced during the previous growing season to be directed to root growth since there is little demand from the top.”

Don’t get me wrong.  People have good reasons for planting in the spring … “I wanted to see the blooms before I plant” … or even the summer …”The grandparents are here for a week to watch the kids so we finally have time to work in the yard.”  But, for optimum success for your tree or shrub, the experts agree … plant in the fall.

For more information, we suggest the following guidance:

  • http://www.clemson.edu/extension/hgic/plants/landscape/shrubs/hgic1052.html
  • http://www.clemson.edu/extension/hgic/plants/landscape/trees/hgic1001.html

Behind the Counter – 2015 Issue

Community Journals, LLC,  Photo Credit: Carol Boone Stewart

Holy Hydrangeas and Other Shrubs

As Spring approaches, Martin Garden Center is becoming more and more populated with plants.  Perennials and annuals are always popular because spring fever seems to instill the need for flowering plants.  Yet, the anchor in any yard is its shrubbery.

Shrubs provide the backdrop for all home gardens, and selecting the proper shrub becomes a quest, in many cases, to find the right shrub of the right size and right color and right sun tolerance.  Twenty years ago, consumer choices were limited to boxwood and holly for sun, and azaleas and camellias for shade.  Now, with hybridization and selected propagation, there are even some species, long ago limited to shady areas, such as some select hydrangeas, that are now sun tolerant. Holy hydrangea!

With shrubs of every color and shape and texture and sun tolerance that there are almost too many choice … ALMOST.  One of the greatest attributes of Martin Garden Center, besides the amazing and very helpful signage, is the vast experience in plant knowledge and garden planning held by the staff, as well as their willingness to impart that knowledge to gardeners on that quest for the right shrubs to anchor their garden.

From Arborvitae to Yews (yes, I know it was supposed to be A to Z, but we just don’t carry any Z shrubs right for this climate … yet), our shrubs will give your garden the right foundation to spring forward into Spring.  And, when that hybrid Z-shrub finally becomes available, we’ll carry it too!

A New Greenhouse Shipment

The arrival of our new shipment of greenhouse plants, and discovering the contents of each box or bag, felt almost like opening presents on Christmas Day.  The items, shipped in breathable cardboard boxes or wrapped in Kraft paper for protective purposes, opened some spectacular beauty.   The orchids, double stemmed, became immediate favorites with customers, four already having found loving homes by 2 pm.  Others will be scooped up quickly, due to their unmatched quality as much as the fact that they make such great Valentines Day living bouquets.

Other popular house plants for Valentines include the Red Valentine Chinese Evergreen (Aglaonema) and the Red Flowering Anthurium, heart shaped especially for the season … well … not especially for this season, but you get the idea.  My personal favorite … the tree ferns.  Simply stunning.